Farmersgirl Kitchen

Two nations…

Uncategorized | December 8, 2009 | By

The Imperfect Housewife left a kind comment on my last blog post. We have a little thing going here about ‘two nations divided by one language’ lol!

So to the thorny problem of measurements and translations! You will see that I have a little gizmo on the side of my blog called Culiverter, this will help you to work out the quantities into cups.

Yes, your cookies are our biscuits.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say: A biscuit (pronounced /ˈbɪskɨt/) is a kind of small, flat-baked bread product that is usually made with a chemical leavener such as baking powder. The exact meaning varies markedly in different parts of the world, and the meanings in British English and American English are quite distinct. The origin of the word “biscuit” is from Latin via Middle French and means “cooked twice,”[1] hence biscotti in Medieval Italian (similar to the German Zwieback, and still present in Dutch “beschuit“). In modern Italian usage the term biscotto is used to refer to any type of cookie, but not a savory cracker. Some of the original biscuits were British naval hard tack; such hard tack was made in the United States through the 19th century. Throughout most of the world, the term biscuit still means a hard, crisp, brittle bread, except in the United States and Canada, where it now denotes a softer bread product baked only once. The word ‘biscuit’ transliterated into Russian or Ukrainian has come to mean ‘sponge cake’.

What you call biscuits we call scones and we eat them with butter and jam (jelly to you) or with cheese or if you are my husband with cheese and marmalade (orange jelly) eeeuch!

In England some people pronounce ‘scones’ like ‘stones’, but in Scotland we pronounce them like prawns – scawns.

How confused are you now, bet you wish you’d never asked.

Comments

  1. Leave a Reply

    Wendy
    December 8, 2009

    ….and some of us in England pronounce scones as "skons" LOL

  2. Leave a Reply

    Chow and Chatter
    December 9, 2009

    love this I live in the south so am used to biscuits but like scones better biscuits here can be very greasy lol

  3. Leave a Reply

    LDH
    December 9, 2009

    I love having a Scottish blog friend although those measurements sometimes are a bit confusing. I'll try the conversion on your sidebar.

    I love scones, toasted with butter and yup, orange marmalade. 🙂

  4. Leave a Reply

    kate the bake
    December 10, 2009

    Funny and interesting. I made US-style biscuits for the first time on Monday, just to try them out. They were definitely scone-like and very heavy on the bicarb (though that maybe just the glutenfree recipe conversion).
    Btw I am with Wendy "skon" – this debate was a regular one in my home growing up between my Lancastrian "skon" mum and my London "skown" dad!

  5. Leave a Reply

    kate the bake
    December 10, 2009

    Funny and interesting. I made US-style biscuits for the first time on Monday, just to try them out. They were definitely scone-like and very heavy on the bicarb (though that maybe just the glutenfree recipe conversion).
    Btw I am with Wendy "skon" – this debate was a regular one in my home growing up between my Lancastrian "skon" mum and my London "skown" dad!

  6. Leave a Reply

    The imPerfect Housewife
    December 10, 2009

    No we call scones scones and biscuits biscuits and cookies cookies. We're such simple people. HA HA Like do you have Oreos over there? Does their package say biscuits since it's there? Do you have refrigerator biscuits, like Pillsbury, that come in a pop-open can? Scones here are kind of like a triangle thick biscuit/cookie, whereas biscuits are like bread only smaller and round and doughy. I know! What do you dip in the gravy when you make stew – do you have stew? Don't tell me French bread because I can't deal with any more countries in my head right now. Can we all get together and eat pizza – that's pretty universal isn't it? Then we can have cake – I know you have cake! Marie Antoinette said, "Let them eat cake," (I know, French) but maybe she really meant pie. HA HA This is so fun – am I the only one enjoying this?? I know, I need to get a hobby. Cheerio! Hey, do you have Cheerios over there?

  7. Leave a Reply

    The imPerfect Housewife
    December 10, 2009

    And we do pronounce scone like "own" or "stone". Or as I tell my teens, "Get off the PHONE!" Last thing…when we think of scones over here, we think of fancy.

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